IPLC 2017 Program Information

Download the Print Program

*Please note the Program is subject to change

Download the PAAG

*Please note the Program is subject to change

Download the Brief Program

*Please note the Program is subject to change

Download the Detailed Program

*Please note the Program is subject to change

RunWestin Program

Get an active start to your day!

Join us first thing for a morning jog (5k and 8k options) mapped out by the RunWestin program.
Meet at the Westin’s run concierge by the bell desk in the main lobby at 6:30 each morning.

Thursday, April 13, 6:30 am start
Friday, April 14, 6:30 am start

Click to view the run map. The map will also be available at the registration desk.

Run Map

Download the Active Workshops Schedule

*Please note the Program is subject to change

Active Workshops

All active workshops, except the PLAY Superhero Training, will be held at the MLSE Launchpad. Located in Toronto’s urban centre of Moss Park, MLSE Launchpad serves as an ambitious “living lab” to explore and measure how sport can help improve the lives of youth.

PLAY Superhero Training ($50 charge not included in registration fee)

Ashley Fox, Lea Weins and special guests
University of Calgary Be Fit for Life Centre and  Sport for Life Society

Markham PanAm Games Centre 9:00am – 3:30 pm

We believe that physical literacy has the SUPER POWER to enrich physical activity programs. By creating a positive environment filled with exploration, learning, growth, and play this training is bound to be the best to support your leaders. When equipped with these powers, leaders truly turn into SUPER HEROS. The SUPER HEROS leave this training with the knowledge and skills to facilitate a 3 hour physical literacy training workshop in their organization, increasing the amount of super staff on their team. Join us in this ACTION packed workshop to kick start a great conference!

This workshop is offered for an additional charge of $50. Transportation and lunch are included in the workshop fee. If you require transportation to and from the Westin Harbour Castle, please contact lea@sportforlife.ca

The Groove: Engaging the BODY, BRAIN and BEING to Build Physical Literacy

Michelle Hillier
The Groove EDGEucation/UOIT/York University

The Groove Approach is an innovative and evidence-based teaching pedagogy which nurtures the physical, cognitive, social and emotional needs of all participants. In this workshop, experience how this can develop physical literacy by using simple movement sequencing, repetition, creativity and social inclusion with no time or peer pressure. Material can be used as one-off activities for skill development, warmup games or in a playlist sequence. Be inspired by global music to improve strength, stamina, coordination, balance, agility and social skills. You can’t get it wrong!

Strength & FUNditioning - Linking Games and Play to Strength and Conditioning

Chris Wright and Sarah LeBlanc
PISE (Pacific Institute for Sport Excellence)

Strength & FUNditioning will help participants to understand the importance of physical literacy development for participants with disabilities. This workshop will take participants through what universally accessible programs are and how to plan and create them.  It will also help participants to develop their adaptations to fundamental movement skills to allow for different disability types to participate and have a quality first involvement experience.

Getting Students ACTIVE with DANCE in Physical Education

Melanie Levenberg
PL3Y International Inc.

Students are motivated by music and dance – learn how to develop fundamental movement skills and physical literacy in your PE classes through a new and innovative curriculum-based dance program that also meets daily physical activity requirements. DANCEPL3Y(dance-play) ED is a high-energy physical activity program designed by H&PE experts to develop physical literacy. Students learn simple moves from a variety of dance styles – Hip Hop, Urban, Bollywood, African, Jazz/Funk as they develop fundamental movement skills in an engaging and interACTIVE space. Watch self-confidence, positive attitudes and a sense of community emerge in your classes as you learn how to boost mental health with the 3 Rules of PL3Y: Be Positive. Be Fun. Be Yourself.

The Groove: Engaging the BODY, BRAIN and BEING in the Early Years

Michelle Hillier
The Groove EDGEucation/UOIT/York University

The Groove Approach allows for equal engagement of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional needs of the child to be addressed. In this experiential and active session, participants will learn how to apply The Groove Approach to the active start/early years sector. At this crucial stage, our young ones need to build their physical literacy through playful activities which explore fundamental movement skills, nurture healthy peer relationships and promote a positive sense of self. Come experience The Groove and engage the BODY, BRAIN and BEING!

A Practical Demonstration of Adapting Games and Activities for Children and Youth with a Disability

Chris Wright and Sarah LeBlanc
PISE (Pacific Institute for Sport Excellence)

Learn how to adapt games and activities for children and youth with a disability in this practical workshop. Interact with equipment that can be used to change and adapt games as well as problem solve rule changes to allow for inclusive programming. Discover simple strategies that can significantly increase the accessibility of your programming and allow you to tailor games to optimally challenge every individual.

Engaging ALL children

Susan Walker
Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool

Research suggests that the number of obese and inactive people is increasing globally (young and old) and this has far reaching implications on health and well-being. During school years, physical education lessons play a key role in ensuring that children are physically active and experience fun and enjoyment. More recently this holistic view of physical education has been likened to the concept of physical literacy which is described as: ?the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge and understanding to value and take responsibility for engagement in physical activities for life? (Whitehead, 2015). Research by McCarthy and Walker (2014) highlights the need for teachers to create lessons that enable the physical competency to improve within a positive environment utilising a pedagogy of engagement. This enable children to develop their confidence, motivation and knowledge (the ‘how’ of physical literacy). This programme was written to provide teachers with a series of physical activities which can be delivered in a way that enables every child to make progress on their physical literacy journey.

A Fireside Chat: Exploring Connections Between Risky Play and Physical Literacy

Brandy Tanenbaum and Sarah Gallsworthy
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and Sport for Life

Risky play is an emerging concept of engaging children in physical activities that contribute to their excitement and enjoyment of movement, but have additional benefits of developing self-esteem, risk and spatial awareness, and various physical competencies. Another dimension of risky play is the potential for injury that has some traditional injury preventionists concerned. The objective of the session is to understand the ways by which children can explore a broader expression of physical activity that supports existing, and develops new comprehension of the world around them and their ability to thrive. In this casual fireside chat format, the concepts of risky play and physical literacy will be examined for alignments, challenges and synergies. Session participants are encouraged to contribute to the evolving conversation about the role of risky play as it relates to physical literacy. Where does risky play fit in? How can it be included? What is needed to support parents and organizations to embrace risky play? Working knowledge is not required to attend this session, as it will also include an overview on the key concepts of risky play.

Physical Literacy 501: Inclusive Physical Literacy

Andrea Carey and Chris Wright
Sport for Life and PLSE (Pacific Institute for Sport Excellence) 

Inclusive Physical Literacy will help participants to understand the importance of physical literacy development for participants with disabilities. This workshop will take participants through what universally accessible programs are and how to plan and create them.  It will also help participants to develop their adaptations to fundamental movement skills to allow for different disability types to participate and have a quality first involvement experience.

Improving Physical Literacy in Intermediate Grades Using TGfU - Example Using Baseball/Softball Games

Sandi Lavery and Jodie Pickering
College of the Rockies  and University of Victoria

This active session will quickly review the fundamentals of ?Teaching Games for Understanding? (TGfU) and then have participants try various games that will enhance not only the fundamental sport skills, but also allow for increased knowledge in strategy and tactics in field games. A variety of baseball/softball games will be introduced to show the advantage of using TGfU at the intermediate and junior high age groups. If time allows, participants may have time to adapt TGfU to other territorial games.

Physical Literacy: Getting Ready for Movement

Ted Temertzoglou
Thompson Books

Using Canadian Sport of Life’s Physical Literacy Movement Preparation Guide, participants will be taken through a series of developemntally appropriate movement prepreations circuits. Additionally, participants will take part in movement prepreation games that can be easily implemented in various sectors.

Creating and Changing Primary Physical Literacy Games

Sandi Lavery and Jodie Pickering
College of the Rockies and University of Victoria

This active session will emphasize the continual changing up of primary physical literacy games (Space, Task, Equipment, and People) to develop fundamental movement skills and fundamental sport skills in elementary school children. Teaching children the language, as well as the understanding of movement leads to perceived competence and improved self-confidence. Strategies and ideas for task progression and progressive competitiveness will be included. Games and ideas from Cranbrook’s Physical Literacy Lunch-hour games program manual with be shared.

Developing Physical Literacy Through Dance

Melanie Levenberg
PL3Y International Inc.

Get kids, teens and adults ACTIVE with a new and energizing recreation & fitness program specifically designed to develop physical literacy though dance. This session will highlight three communities across Canada who have successfully implemented a physical literacy and dance program through instructor development, member-engagement and community events. DANCEPL3Y (dance-play) is the world’s only pre-choreographed physical literacy and dance program for recreation and fitness centres. In these high-energy classes, participants learn simple movements from a variety of dance styles (Hip Hop, Bollywood, African, Disco, Jazz and more) and get ACTIVE as they develop Fundamental Movement Skills through fitness challenges, games and playful dance activities. Taught by Certified Instructors, the classes promote positive mental health through the 3 Rules of PLAY: Be Positive. Be Fun. Be Yourself.